The City of York Deposit Model consists of data captured (for the most part) prior to 1992.

The data was captured in three phases:

  1. as part of the York Development and Archaeology Study
  2. to complete capture data held in the York Archaeological Trust archive (up to 1992)
  3. a pilot study undertaken by Kurt Hunter-Mann (completed in 2017) to capture additional data for the Bishophill area from grey literature reports on archaeological interventions carried out between 1992 and 2017

Updating the York Deposit Model

The pilot study demonstrated there's a considerable set of additional data captured in grey literature reports on archaeological interventions carried out since 1992.

A project proposal is in place to capture this additional data and update the Deposit Model as recommended in the York Development and Archaeology Study Review. The Deposit Model dataset consists of 2,796 individual records.

Each record contains 13 fields:

  • EvUID (Event Unique Identifier)
  • Type (Code Type of Event)
  • Desc (Description of Event Type)
  • Period (Chronological period)
  • Description (Description of deposit)
  • Height (height of top of deposit in metres Above Ordnance Datum AOD)
  • Thickness (in metres)
  • Moisture (wet or dry)
  • Quality (Stratified or Disturbed)
  • Residual
  • Anaerobic
  • Easting (10 figure OS grid reference)
  • Northing (10 figure OS grid reference)

This data is presented in a single downloadable spreadsheet of all Deposit Model records.

Deposit Model data by period

There's also eight spreadsheets where Deposit Model data is presented by period:

  1. Natural stratigraphy
  2. Prehistoric
  3. Roman
  4. Anglian
  5. Anglo-Scandinavian
  6. Medieval
  7. Post-medieval
  8. Modern

The Deposit Model dataset can be used to map these data points within the historic core of York, an area broadly the same as that enclosed by the City Walls.

We make the data available for research and non-commercial use, but we ask that you share these outputs with our Historic Environment Record if you use it to produce visualisations, or in any other ways.

Also see

Comment on this page