We have installed 10 new signs to welcome visitors to York, each featuring a different image to represent the city.

Map of York's welcome signs

York's welcome signs are located around our boundary at 10 locations; see our map - the position of welcome signs is highlighted by a 'CYC' icon on our dashed bounday line: CYC icon, denotes location of welcome sign on the map


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Images on York's welcome signs

The images for York's welcome signs were chosen in collaboration with Make It York to promote different elements of the area, and highlight aspects of the city's rich culture, unique heritage and contribution to the world.

Stained glass on Yorks new boundary signThe river on Yorks new boundary signAn Anglo Saxon Helmet on Yorks new boundary signThe City Walls on Yorks new boundary signChocolate on Yorks new boundary signFibre optic cables on Yorks new boundary signFood on Yorks new boundary signFootsteps on Yorks new boundary signA Theatre curtain on Yorks new boundary signA Train wheel on Yorks new boundary sign

Find out more about each of the signs:

  1. Stained glass
  2. The river
  3. Anglo Saxon helmet
  4. The City Walls
  5. Chocolate
  6. Fibre optic cable
  7. International food festival
  8. Footsteps
  9. Theatre curtain
  10. Train wheel

1. Stained glass
To represent York Minster, the largest gothic cathedral in Northern Europe. York Minster has 2000 years of history, 275 steps up the Central Tower to the highest point in the city and holds the second highest office in the Church of England with the seat for the Archbishop of York. The city of York and the Crown have also have a long history, April 1642: King Charles I moved his family and court to York, bringing his family and court with him, making York the capital of the Kingdom again for six months.

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2. The river
To showcase the mighty river Ouse. The river Ouse was crucial for early trade routes bringing spice, coffee and chocolate to the city by barge, where trade was regularly conducted until the 1990’s. The river Ouse was also the access point for the Vikings, when in September 1066, a Norwegian king sailed up the Ouse towards York with an invasion force of 300 ships.

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3. Anglo Saxon helmet
Found in the Coppergate archaeological digs of 1976 – 1981, now home to the world famous JORVIK Viking Centre. This symbolises the many different nationalities that have studied, visited and/or made their home in York.

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4. The City Walls
The longest complete medieval town walls in England. The walls have played their part in shaping the history of York, from displaying the heads of traitors, to stopping the Queen from entering until she’s paid alms. The City Walls were saved from demolition by residents in the 19th century and remain a representation of how much we love our city and will continue to preserve its heritage.

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5. Chocolate
A nod to York’s chocolate heritage and the social reform pioneered by chocolate leaders; Nestlé, Rowntrees and Terry’s. York is home to Nestlé’s Product Technology Centre (PTC), known as Nestlé’s centre of excellence for chocolate.

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6. Fibre optic cable
Representing innovation and creativity, as well as York’s UNESCO City of Media Arts Status, Science City York and being recognised as the first gigabit city in the UK. The current UK average for fibre penetration is around 6%, while York will be leading the way with close to 70% fibre penetration by 2020.

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7. International Food Festival
Reflecting York’s packed festival calendar, covering everything from Vikings to Ice Sculptures. York also has a long history of enjoying good food. Lord Mayors were expected to host dinners at the Mansion House from 1732, where many dishes were served and often assisted by chefs from London. Since then, York is fast developing a reputation for hosting high-end exceptional restaurants including a Michelin star restaurant.

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8. Footsteps
One of the oldest shopping street in Europe. York’s shopping streets date back to the 12th century and host a variety of high street, high end and independent retailers, making the city the forerunner for experiencing retail in one convenient location.

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9. Theatre curtain
Putting York’s rich cultural and nightlife scene in the spotlight. York Theatre Royal, Grand Opera House and York Assembly Rooms have called York home since the 18th century, and the city is still leading the way in entertainment and hospitality, with a variety of cinemas, theatres and street entertainment, as well as the world-famous Mystery Plays.

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10. Train wheel
A symbol of York’s railway heritage and the city’s first railway station, which further opened up trade routes to York, strengthening our economy. York is also home to the National Railway Museum, which has been the recipient of the European Museum of the Year Award.

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