Neighbourhood planning

Neighbourhood Planning

Planned maintenance to payments system

We're making essential updates to our payments system from 1pm on Thurs 19 October to midday on Fri 20 October. We apologise that we won't be able to take online or telephone payments during this time

Government rules give local communities powers to create their own plans and policies. Download 'A step by step guide to producing a Neighbourhood Plan' to see how your community can get involved.

Parish councils in York already working towards producing Neighbourhood Plans are:

Creating Neighbourhood Plans

By law, Neighbourhood Plans must be in line with national planning policy, strategic policies in our Local Plan and where applicable, meet EU regulations including:

The Neighbourhood Planning Regulations came into force in April 2012 and set out the detailed legislative framework for undertaking Neighbourhood Plans. These were amended in 2015 and 2016. The most recent amendment, which came into force in October 2016, prescribes 2 cases where a Local Planning Authority must designate all of the neighbourhood areas specified in a neighbourhood area application.

These are:

  • Where a parish council applies for the whole parish to be designated as a neighbourhood area or applies to enlarge an existing designation of a smaller part of the parish to cover the whole of the parish (this requirement does not apply where some of the parish is already part of a neighbourhood area that extends beyond the parish boundaries).
  • Where an LPA has not determined an application for designation of a neighbourhood area by the date prescribed. This requirement does not apply where any part of the area applied for has already been designated or is included in an area designation application that has not yet been decided.

The Localism Act

The Localism Act 2011 encourages local communities to come together and get more involved in planning for their areas by producing Neighbourhood Plans which can set out policies for planning, development and the use of land in a neighbourhood, including:

  • where new homes and offices should be built
  • what they should look like
  • what new community facilities are needed and where

A Neighbourhood Plan can be detailed or general depending what local people want, but must still meet the needs of the wider area. In most cases, this means Neighbourhood Plans have to take into account our current 'evidence bases' including assessments of housing and other development needs in the area.

Also see

Comment on this page
Feedback
Back to the top of the page